Illustrating the Peace Corps Experience

The art of illustration links creative expression with the need to clearly communicate sometimes-complex thoughts and ideas. Using a variety of media, illustration majors in associate professor Cora Lynn Deibler’s ‘Topics in Illustration’ class in the Department of Art and Art History have used their skills to capture the essence of the U.S. Peace Corps, as it celebrates 50 years of global outreach.

<p> During the course of the semester, several of UConn’s returned Peace Corps volunteers have met with Deibler’s students to tell their stories.  Using acrylic on masonite, illustration student Philip Morgan has created a realistic representation of a Peace Corps volunteer. Photos by Sean Flynn</p>

During the semester, several of UConn’s returned Peace Corps volunteers met with Deibler’s students to tell their stories. Illustration student Philip Morgan uses acrylic on masonite to create a realistic representation of a Peace Corps volunteer. Photos by Sean Flynn

<p>Victor Preato, illustration major works on a computer illustration celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps. Photo by Sean Flynn</p>

The countries represented by the returned volunteers include Micronesia, Ghana, Korea, Guatemala, and Uzbekistan. Making a drawing using a mouse pen on a digital tablet, Victor Preato combines old and new design techniques to translate the volunteers' stories into art.

<p>Shaun Kelly’s poster, from concept through press-ready artwork, is a product of digital design. He focused on the half century since President John F. Kennedy made his October 14, 1960 campaign promise a reality. By creating the Peace Corps as one of the first acts of his young presidency, Kennedy created an enduring legacy.Photos by Sean Flynn</p>

Shaun Kelly’s poster, from concept through press-ready artwork, is a product of digital design. He focused on the half-century since President John F. Kennedy made his 1960 campaign promise a reality by creating the Peace Corps as one of the first acts of his presidency.

<p>Dylan Fedora works in watercolors to create his commemorative poster which will be among those displayed on campus next spring during ceremonies observing the Peace Corps’ official birthday in March.  Finished poster will all be 18” x 24”, yet they are all very different in texture, design, and message.  </p>

Dylan Fedora works in watercolors to create a commemorative poster that will be among those displayed on campus in the spring, during ceremonies observing the Peace Corps’ official birthday in March.

<p>Sherry Wong, illustration major works on a illustration celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps. Photo by Sean Flynn</p>

Stories from the volunteers relating their experiences provided inspiration to Sherry Wong, who is working in acrylics. The skills UConn's returned volunteers brought to their Peace Corps service include teaching English as a second language, animal husbandry, and resource management.

<p>UConn’s returned volunteers are among over 200,000 Americans to have served in the Peace Corps, making it one of the most successful U.S. foreign policy initiatives ever.  Kelsey Tynik used digital technology to transform her thoughts into design. Her artwork was originally drawn by hand, and then scanned into the computer. Here she is working on hand done letter forms.   </p>

UConn’s returned volunteers are among more than 200,000 Americans to have served in the Peace Corps, making it one of the most successful U.S. foreign policy initiatives ever. Kelsey Tynik used digital technology to transform her thoughts into design. Her artwork was originally drawn by hand, and then scanned into the computer.