Food for Thought at UConn’s First Science Salon

Anson Ma, center, assistant professor of chemical engineering, speaks during the UConn Science Salon held at NIXS Hartford on June 4, 2015. At left is lakshmi Nair, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery and chemical, materials and bio-molecular engineering. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Anson Ma, center, assistant professor of chemical engineering, speaks during the UConn Science Salon held at NIXS Hartford on June 4, 2015. At left is lakshmi Nair, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery and chemical, materials and bio-molecular engineering. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

Researchers came face to face with the public at the first UConn Science Salon in Hartford Thursday evening for a lively discussion of state-of-the-art initiatives in 3D printing and the potential for the technology – also known as additive manufacturing – particularly in the field of health care.

The next event in the series, “SciFi Meets Reality,” will be held in Hartford on Sept. 17, from 6 to 8 p.m., at a location to be announced. For more information and to register, go to UConnAlumni.com/ScienceSalon.

Panelist Anson Ma, center, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, makes a presentation about some of his work in the field of 3D printing during the UConn Science Salon held at NIXS Hartford on June 4. At left is Lakshmi Nair, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery and chemical, materials, and biomolecular engineering, who served as moderator. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Panelist Anson Ma, center, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, makes a presentation about some of his work in the field of 3D printing during the UConn Science Salon held at NIXS Hartford on June 4. At left is Lakshmi Nair, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery and chemical, materials, and biomolecular engineering, who served as moderator. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
The science cafe, which was facilitated by the University and the UConn Foundation, drew a sold-out crowd of 120 alumni, faculty, staff, and members of the public. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
The science cafe, which was facilitated by the University and the UConn Foundation, drew a sold-out crowd of 120 alumni, faculty, staff, and members of the public. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Richard Langlois, professor of economics, discusses the societal implications of additive manufacturing technology. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Richard Langlois, professor of economics, discusses the societal implications of additive manufacturing technology. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
In addition to Ma and Langlois, panelists included Dr. John Geibel, second from left, director of surgical research at Yale University School of Medicine, and Dale Kutnick, right, distinguished analyst at the technology research firm Gartner Inc. Geibel leads a teams of researchers developing a viable regenerative or bioengineered liver. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
In addition to Ma and Langlois, panelists included Dr. John Geibel, second from left, director of surgical research at Yale University School of Medicine, and Dale Kutnick, right, distinguished analyst at the technology research firm Gartner Inc. Geibel leads a teams of researchers developing a viable regenerative or bioengineered liver. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Brief presentations by each panelist were followed by a lively question-and-answer session. Here, Anson Ma, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, center, responds to a question. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Brief presentations by each panelist were followed by a lively question-and-answer session. Here, Anson Ma, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, center, responds to a question. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Anson Ma speaks with guests following the event. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Anson Ma speaks with guests following the event. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)