Special Feature

2021 Commencement

The Class of 2021 arrived at UConn in 2017 with a wealth of promise: they boasted a record number of valedictorians and salutatorians; they were the first students to set foot on the brand-new UConn Hartford campus; and they were the first to take up residential living at UConn Stamford.

What no one could have imagined on those hot August days four years ago is that they would fulfill that promise amidst a set of challenges and world-changing events that ranged from the largest protest movement in American history to a global pandemic that altered every facet of life on the planet.

For the Class of 2021, though, "challenge" is just another word for "opportunity," and as they prepare to take their place with Husky graduates going back to 1883, they're showing the world what it means to rise to the occasion.

Congratulations - from Avery Point, from Farmington, from Hartford, from Stamford, from Storrs, from Waterbury, and from towns all over Connecticut, the country, and the world. The next chapter is yours to write, and as new graduates of the University of Connecticut, you'll get to write it in blue and white.

UConn Alma Mater "Old Connecticut"

Dana Chamberlain

College of Agriculture, Health & Natural Resources

Dana Chamberlain
Why did you choose UConn?
UConn had always been my top choice for several reasons: 1) it was familiar: so many of the people I looked up to from my high school went here. 2) The education is rigorous. 3) There are lots of research and job opportunities. 4) The student population is huge, so you can meet new people every year. 5) There are lots of clubs and activities on campus every single week. 6) There's a lot of pride in being a UConn Husky.

 

What's your major/area of study and why did you choose it?
Ever since I was young, I've had a keen interest in healthy eating, cooking, and exercise. I took a nutrition class for fun my freshman year and my professor told us about this great opportunity to participate in a summer research experience for undergraduates (REU) in the Nutritional Sciences department at UConn. I applied for the program, got in, and spent 10 weeks learning about how the regulation of specific genes in liver cells can cause a person to develop liver disease. The professors I met were all super knowledgeable about their field of study and very supportive of my academic goals. After that summer, I decided to declare the non-dietetics track in Nutritional Sciences.

 

What activities were you involved with as a student?
I was involved with various clubs and organizations, served as a mentor to other students, participated in research, and held several leadership positions. I was involved in the Undergraduate Student Government (USG) and an activist group on campus called Collaborative Organizing (UCCO). I served as a student mentor for The Major Experience (TME) program and as an ambassador for the College of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources. I participated in both molecular and community nutrition research through the McNair Scholars program. I also served as the first secretary of the UConn Hartford Arts Club and the treasurer of DesignedBlack.

 

Any advice for incoming first-year students?
One piece of advice I have is to always prioritize your mental wellbeing. If you're having a rough week, you can reach out to your professors to get extra time to complete an assignment. You can also reach out SHaW-Mental Health for medical advice, the Dean of Students Office to receive extra academic support, and the Center for Students with Disabilities to receive housing and/or academic accommodations to help you get through anything you might be struggling with. You are so important and valuable to our campus community and all the communities you are a part of. An assignment can wait; your mental health cannot.

 

What's one thing every student should do during their time at UConn?
Attend an event or trip hosted by SUBOG or USG! Through these organizations, I have been able to travel to New York City (twice!), Salem, Massachusetts, and Newport, Rhode Island for a reduced price or free! I also got to meet Yara Shahidi, see Pete Davidson perform live at the Jorgensen Center, and attended a live, virtual Q&A with one of my personal heroes, Angela Davis.

 

What's one thing that will always make you think of UConn?
Basketball and ice cream! Go Huskies!

Additional Student Profiles: Eric Atanga, Zachary Duda, Emma MacDonald, Caroline Selesky

Daniel Crovo

Neag School of Education

Daniel Crovo
What was your major and why did you choose it?
My major is Special Education in the Integrated Bachelors/Masters Program in the Neag School of Education. I chose this major because my brother has autism and cerebral palsy, and after my father passed away at a young age, we became really close afterwards. I became really involved in all his programs from a young age - baseball, swimming, Special Olympics, and his camp. I have stayed involved ever since and built many relationships with his peers, and it has really grown my love for working with individuals with disabilities. I am still involved in all his programs to this day, including running his swimming and baseball programs in East Hartford.

 

What are your plans after graduation?
I will be continuing my education to earn my Master's at UConn in Educational Psychology, and then I plan to teach somewhere in the Greater Hartford area as a special education teacher.

 

How has UConn prepared you for the next chapter in life?
UConn provided me new perspectives on the environment around me and gave me a life experience that I have never had before.

 

What's one thing that surprised you about UConn?
One thing that surprised me about UConn is how small such a big campus can be, in terms of size and people. There are so many people at UConn, but I was able to find so many different places and communities where I could make so many friends. Even though on the first day it felt overwhelming, with time UConn felt so small in such a big campus, and no matter where I was walking I seemed to know someone.

 

Any advice for incoming first-year students?
Find your community. There are so many places on campus where you can find a space where you can grow and feel comfortable, and it is so important to take healthy risks and find that space.

 

What's one thing every student should do during their time at UConn?
Try something new. In high school, I played baseball and swam and I wanted to continue to have a team environment. I tried Club Water Polo my Freshman and Sophomore year, and the team bond was one of the best experiences of my college career, and I ended up loving it.

Additional Student Profiles: Tamashi Hettiarachchi, Rowan Page, Daniel Tavares

Four Years. Eight Semesters. So Many Memes.

Do you remember where you were when you heard UConn was rejoining the Big East? Maybe not, but you almost definitely had a strong opinion on whether it was "Laurel" or "Yanny," considered the wisdom - or lack thereof - of storming Area 51, or binge-watched "Tiger King" on Netflix (it was totally "Laurel" btw).

The last four years have been full of world-historical events we'll remember all our lives, but that's not the only way we mark time. Memes - the viral, time-passing sensations we all love, hate, and swiftly get tired of before ironically reviving them - have become memory-stimulating signposts along our journey through life.

So here they are, along with major milestones in UConn history for comparison - the memes we couldn't get out of our heads between 2017 and 2021.

Jan 2017

IYKYK.

Aug 2017

One of the most influential memes to spread the object labeling trend.

Aug 2017
Return to Hartford

After 47 years, UConn returns to Connecticut's capital city, with UConn Hartford opening as a state-of-the-art campus centered around the restored Hartford Times building, in the heart of downtown.

Oct 2017

Some call this the sassiest meme of 2017.

Nov 2017
National Championship

The UConn Field Hockey team wins the national championship in Kentucky, completing an undefeated season. It's the 3rd national championship for Coach Nancy Stevens, who will retire in 2020 as the winningest coach in NCAA field hockey history.

Mar 2018

Joke is on us. Mason Ramsey went on to perform at Coachella and release a single.

May 2018

What do you hear?

May 2018
President Susan Herbst

Susan Herbst, the first woman to lead UConn since its inception, announces her plans to step down as president. Her eight-year term saw tremendous growth and change in the student body, faculty, and facilities of the University.

Sep 2018
Grand Opening

The Innovation Partnership Building at UConn Tech Park, a cutting-edge research facility where UConn researchers collaborate with industry partners from a wide variety of disciplines, is officially opened.

Jan 2019

The most-liked post on Instagram.

Jan 2019

How hard did aging hit you?

Jun 2019

They can't stop all of us...

Jun 2019
Big East

The Board of Trustees accepts an invitation for most UConn sports teams to rejoin the Big East Athletic Conference, where its basketball teams became national powers in the 1990s and 2000s.

Aug 2019
16th President

Thomas Katsouleas, formerly Provost of the University of Virginia, starts his first day as UConn's 16th president.

Jan 2020

Dolly was always a trendsetter.

Feb 2020
HuskyTHON

HuskyTHON, the 18-hour dance marathon that raises money for Connecticut Children's Medical, raises more than $1.5 million, the highest total in the event's 20-year history.

Mar 2020
Tiger King

We couldn't pick just one Tiger King meme.

Mar 2020
COVID Begins

The University announces that, because of growing concern over the spread of COVID-19, classes after Spring Break will be entirely remote. At the time, many health experts estimate the "lockdown" period could last up to two weeks.

Sep 2020

From celebrities to brands to politicians, everyone jumped on this all-purpose meme in 2020.

Mar 2021
Tournament Time

For the first time since 2016, both the UConn men's and women's basketball teams are selected to play in their respective NCAA tournaments.

May 2021
That's a Wrap!

Five days of in-person and virtual commencement ceremonies begin, capping one of the most remarkable periods in the 140-year history of the University of Connecticut.

Kelly Finn

School of Business

Kelly Finn
Why did you choose UConn?
As a first-generation college student, I committed to UConn after receiving an offer to attend on a merit-based, full-ride scholarship, the Day of Pride scholarship.

 

What's your major and why did you choose it?
I knew I wanted to be a Finance major coming into UConn. I knew nothing about finance, except that it was a technical business field conducive to people-who-like-people types, like myself. I did not enter UConn as a business major, so I had to take a set of foundational classes required for entry into the School of Business, including microeconomics. I found that my sometimes-annoying tendency to ask "why" was conducive to the highly analytical and theoretical study of Economics, and therefore a fun arena in which to stretch my brain and supplement the systematic understanding of business I was developing in the Finance program.

Thanks to UConn's expansive offering of majors, I was able to choose an Economics major specifically oriented towards my interests in international development and environmental sustainability, called Applied and Resource Economics (ARE) in CAHNR. After declaring a dual-degree, I later added a third degree in French in CLAS. Through my 3 UConn degrees combining my academic and personal interests, I have developed a foundation of technical business skills and global perspective.

 

What are your plans after graduation?
I will be moving to Boston to start my career at Bain Capital.

 

What activities were you involved with as a student?
I found my niche in organizations that each subscribed heavily to one of my three core values: UConn Consulting Group for problem solving, the Resident Assistant position for leadership, and Community Outreach Service Days for service.

 

Any advice for incoming first-year students?
Try to live by the "Sit next to people that you do not know in the dining halls" philosophy. Meaning, open yourself up to engaging with new people in even small ways. You would be surprised at the connections you can make, and even the impact you can have on someone by just being an open, kind, curious human being.

Kelly Ha

School of Social Work

Kelly Ha
Why did you choose UConn?
I completed my BA from UConn in 2019. I had a great experience, so it was a given that I would come back to pursue my MSW!

 

Why did you choose your area of study?
I knew I wanted to pursue a career in social work since the age of eight years old. I consider myself lucky because this never changed. I was inspired by the book "The Lost Boy," which changed my life. Despite growing up in a single-parent, low-income household, I felt so incredibly privileged for the support system I had that made me feel like I was never missing anything. This is why I am dedicating my life to helping disadvantaged youth and Asian mental health. It's an homage to my immigrant family, who have sacrificed so much for me to have the life that I have now.

 

What are your plans after graduation?
After graduation, I hope to continue to grow my non-profit organization #IAmNotAVirus that was developed during my first year of MSW. I want to continue to destigmatize mental health in the Asian community as well as make it accessible in different languages so the older generations can understand it, too. I am also looking to pass the LMSW exam and pursue my clinical licensing to become a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW). My dreams are to work at a children's hospital in medical social work or behavioral health.

 

What's one thing that surprised you about UConn?
How absolutely gorgeous the UConn Hartford campus is. It's right downtown and around so many great restaurants. The UConn School of Social Work is beautiful, too! It's like my second home.

 

Any advice for incoming students?
Take advantage of your resources and the services on campus! Talk to your advisors! They are a huge help when it comes to connecting you with services. Use your voice and never be apologetic for who you are.

 

Who was your favorite professor and why?
It has to be Dr. Jason Chang from the UConn AASI department. I took an Asian American Studies course with him my junior year of college and it has impacted my life greatly. I learned so much about my background that I would not have known otherwise. My sister is a freshman at UConn and scheduled to take a class with him this summer! I have never had a teacher/professor that looked like me until Dr. Chang. It's monumental and life changing.

Additional Student Profiles: Sundari Birdsall, Bilge Felek

Adlin Jacinto

School of Nursing

Adlin Jacinto
Why did you choose UConn?
I chose UConn because of how diverse it is. There are students coming from different states and countries, and students with different belief systems. Coming into UConn, I wanted to be challenged and to be put out of my comfort zone because the world is diverse in people and in thought; it was important for me to find a school that reflected that diversity.

 

What's your area of study and why did you choose it?
I chose nursing as my major because I remember I had surgery when I was ten years old. Although all the doctors and providers that saw me were very kind, the person that impacted me the most that day was my nurse. He took the time to make conversation with me even though I was just a kid, and he asked me if I was nervous, which no one else took the time to ask. I remember he didn't know Spanish that well, but he knew that my father and I spoke Spanish, so he started speaking a few words to us. I really appreciated that and it made me realize that nursing is not just about medicine, it's about connecting with your patients as well. To this day, I remember how that nurse made me feel, and I want to make my patients feel seen and comfortable as well.

 

How has UConn prepared you for the next chapter in life?
UConn has prepared me for the next chapter in my life because I faced a lot of adversity here. The classes were difficult, and they were filled with hundreds of students sometimes, so it was challenging to get to know my professor. Being a first-generation college student and coming from a small high school, I was not expecting it to be difficult for me to thrive in a larger school. However, that struggle my freshman year at UConn made me more confident and less hesitant to make myself heard. I needed that struggle to learn how to speak up for myself. I don't think that any other school would have motivated me and shaped me into the person that I am today if I had not gone to UConn.

 

What's one thing that surprised you about UConn?
One thing that surprised me about UConn is how tight-knit the community is here. I thought that it would be difficult to meet people here because the school is so big, but for the most part everyone is friendly and open to making conversation with each other. There are so many groups and clubs to join, such as living in a learning community, going to the cultural centers, and several other organizations on campus.

 

Any advice for incoming first-year students?
My advice for incoming first year students is to find a balance between studying and self-care. It's easy to get carried away and prioritize one over the other, but they're both equally important. To do well in school, you need a break to enjoy your time with friends. You also need to sacrifice sometimes and decide not to go out the weekend before an important exam. Knowing when to prioritize certain things, comes with time and you may not get it right at first. This is okay. Don't be hard on yourself because this is a learning process, and you will fail, but beyond every failure there is always success afterwards.

Additional Student Profiles: Sekinah Ajiboye, Mitchell Friedman, Dahiana Rivera

Anna Marie LaChance

School of Engineering

annamarie lachange
Why did you choose UConn?
Both of my parents and multiple other family members went to UConn, so I was always surrounded by it growing up; basketball, paraphernalia, you name it. My parents heavily encouraged me to apply for my undergrad here, and when I got accepted, I was incredibly proud to become a Husky! After four years, I stayed at UConn for my Ph.D. because I loved learning, and because I found some incredible mentors who would see me through my journey.

 

What's your major/area of study and why did you choose it?
I chose Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering because I had a really great chemistry teacher in high school, Mr. Thomas, who encouraged me to apply. I also did FIRST Robotics Competition in high school, which got me really into engineering!

 

What are your plans after graduation?
Once I get my Ph.D., I plan to join a teaching faculty at a school like UConn. Engineering education is a field unto itself, and there are so many ways I can give back as a college instructor through mentoring and community service!

 

How has UConn prepared you for the next chapter in life?
After being exposed to lots of different perspectives and ways to plug into activist movements, I've developed a teaching philosophy that will guide me throughout my career as an educator, not to mention the vast network of other educators with whom I can collaborate for years to come. Also, as a queer trans woman, being able to transition in such a safe and supportive environment has given me the confidence to make change wherever I go; I will always be thankful for the UConn Rainbow Center and the resources they've provided me!

 

Any advice for incoming first-year students?
Don't limit yourself; get involved in undergraduate research, join some clubs, and find ways to give back to your community. So many resources are out there just waiting to be used!

 

Who was your favorite professor and why?
That's a toss-up; I would have to say either my Ph.D. advisor, Dr. Luyi Sun, or Dr. Jennifer Pascal. Both have been incredible mentors to me for the past four years and have supported my journey to become a teacher!

Additional Student Profiles: Talha Bhatti, Zoe Coleman, Alexis Decker, Justyn Welsh 

#UConn21: By the Numbers

The UConn class of 2021 will be remembered for pushing what is possible and success against all odds. Check out some of the numbers from this impressive group of students.

Ghali Lemtiri-Chlieh

School of Medicine

Ghali Lemtiri Chlieh
What's your major/area of study and why did you choose it?
Urology. I was fortunate to have mentors in this field but ultimately chose this field because it provides an incredible amount of variety in day-to-day practice. It's a surgical specialty that provides continuity of care for all ages within a fast-growing field with all of the technological advancements.

 

What are your plans after graduation?
Starting a five-year residency at the Lahey Medical Center in Burlington, Massachusetts.

 

What activities were you involved with as a student?
I was involved in numerous activities including The South Park Inn student-run Health Clinic, Urban Service Track, teaching in a variety of settings, clinical research, and numerous personal sports activities.

 

How has UConn prepared you for the next chapter in life?
It has given me the tools and knowledge to be an adaptive, hard-working, compassionate physician in any settings I choose to work in.

 

Any advice for incoming first-year students?
Enjoy the day to day. It's very easy to get caught up in the next chapter and worrying about boards, clinical rotations, and career. No matter how tough it gets you will always look back upon that time fondly.

 

Who was your favorite professor and why?
Dr. Jason Ryan, creator of Boards & Beyond. One of the greatest teachers who has helped teach nearly all medical students across the country.

 

What's one thing that will always make you think of UConn?
All of the lifelong friends I've made along the way, including my own partner, Abby, who I met at UConn.

Katherine Merrick

School of Dental Medicine

Katherine Merrick
Why did you choose UConn?
We applied all over the place to a lot of schools. I chose it because of the integration of the dental and medical curriculum. Also because there's only 47 of us in a class.

 

What's your area of study and why did you choose it?
I am a dual dental medical and public health student. I added the public health once I was here. Both my father and grandfather were dentists, and I was adamant I wanted to do my own thing. But I started shadowing, and I found I really loved the long-term relationships and working with my hands. I added on public health because I was attracted to the social justice aspect of oral health. UConn Health functions as a safety net clinic for the Hartford area, and I was struck by the difference getting dental insurance can make in someone's life.

 

What are your plans after graduation?
I will pursue a general practice residency at the University of Vermont, beginning in the middle of June. After I finish residency, my hope is to work in a community health center, or a private practice with a social mission. I hope to advocate for policy and legislation and perhaps get into a governmental role such as state dental director.

 

What activities were you involved in as a student?
Urban Service Track/AHEC Scholars. Dental, medical, nursing, pharmacy and social work students work on serving underserved people in primary care (for example, veterans and the unhoused.) It also works on leadership skills. I currently sit on the alumni-student advisory committee of AHEC. I've done a lot volunteering at UConn; my favorite was the Biomedical Science/Engineering Event for high schoolers!

 

Any advice for incoming students?
There are so many resources, it can be overwhelming. You don't have to study from everything! Some things won't work for you. For example, a lot of my classmates had a First Aid brief reference book. It was so condensed, it didn't work for me. I needed hand holding. I used YouTube a lot!

 

What's one thing that will always make you think of UConn?
I follow Jonathan on Instagram, and I have become the biggest fan of Huskies as dogs. I love him! I got to meet him twice, and I still have those pictures on my phone.

Additional Student Profiles: Njeri Dodson

Husky Tassle Turn

Congratulations, Class of 2021! It's time to turn those tassels from right to left. And welcome to the UConn Alumni family.

Natalie Roach

College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Natalie Roach
Why did you choose UConn?
Ultimately, I chose UConn because it provided similar levels of education as my other options, but at a much lower cost. As someone interested in public policy, I also appreciated the idea of a public university, and the opportunities to interact with state policies that are inherent in attending one. I like that UConn Nation is full of down-to-earth people who are willing to support each other, whether you're an undergraduate or a tenured professor.

 

What's your major/area of study and why did you choose it?
I double majored in Environmental Sciences and Human Rights. I am passionate about making the world a better place, both for our environment and the people in it. I was drawn to these majors because of their interdisciplinary nature.

My Environmental Sciences major has allowed me to learn about the natural world and the human structures in place to protect it. I chose my Human Rights major because I loved the faculty & staff in the Human Rights Institute, and I appreciated that the major was not neutral, but had an intentional objective of protecting human rights.

During my time at UConn, I also learned about the intersection of these two passions, environmental justice, which is the lens through which I approach my work.

 

What are your plans after graduation?
I have been a fast-track student in the Master's of Public Policy program under the Department of Public Policy (DPP). This fast-track program allows UConn undergraduates to take their first year's worth of public policy graduate courses during their four years of undergraduate schooling.

I have been officially accepted into UConn's graduate school! Next year, to complete my Master's of Public Policy, I will spend two semesters taking graduate classes on the Hartford campus. I'm able to do so for free through the school's Internship & Professional Practice program, which will place me with a part-time internship in my field for the school year. So essentially, I am able to get a Master's degree in something I'm passionate about at no cost to me!

 

What activities were you involved with as a student?
I was fortunate to be part of many wonderful communities at UConn, including the student group Revolution Against Rape, the BOLD Women's Leadership Network, the Native American Cultural Programs, the Rainbow Center, the PIRE Project, the Honors Program, the USG Sustainability Subcommittee, and Community Outreach's Alternative Breaks Program. I was also able to lead climate justice activism on campus, as an Office of Sustainability intern, a founder of the Fridays for Future student group & fall 2019 climate strike, and as a member of the President's Working Group on Sustainability & the Environment.

 

What's one thing that surprised you about UConn?
The ability to travel. Going to my home state university, I wasn't sure how many opportunities there would be for this. But UConn is a true global university. I have been able to travel across the country (Utah, Alabama, Oklahoma, D.C.) and across the world (Ethiopia, Spain) for research, service trips, and conferences. All of this was either through a stipend or for a fraction of the cost, and without ever taking a semester abroad!

 

What's one thing every student should do during their time at UConn?
Spend time on Horsebarn Hill, invite someone to lunch that you don't know well, and take advantage of the wide variety of free sports games (swimming & diving, lacrosse, volleyball, etc).

Jasmine Tankard

School of Pharmacy

Jasmine Tankard
Why did you choose UConn?
I visited UConn three times while I was in high school, and the intangible feeling of belonging is what originally drew me to UConn. I ultimately chose UConn because of the immense sense of community, athletics, and the School of Pharmacy.

 

What's your major/area of study and why did you choose it?
My major is Pharmacy. I graduated with my bachelor's in Pharmacy Studies in 2019 and I will graduate with my doctorate of pharmacy (PharmD) this year. My interest in this field began with an interest in biology and chemistry during high school. I ultimately chose this field because I wanted to make a meaningful difference in patients' lives, and pharmacists have a unique scope and skillset to do so. Additionally, I loved the idea of working on an interprofessional team with other health care professionals prioritizing patient-centered care.

 

What are your plans after graduation?
After graduation, I plan to take national and state exams required to be a licensed pharmacist. I will be pursuing a PGY1 pharmacy residency at Boston Medical Center this June.

 

How has UConn prepared you for the next chapter in life?
UConn School of Pharmacy has provided me with a competitive education both inside and outside of the classroom. UConn has also facilitated the opportunity for my internship at a large hospital in Connecticut. UConn has facilitated lifelong friendships and relationships with my mentors, colleagues, and professors.

 

What's one thing that surprised you about UConn?
There is a club or organization for almost every interest or topic you can imagine. And if by chance there isn't, you can create it yourself and likely find people to join you!

 

Any advice for incoming first-year students?
Make the most of your time at UConn! Try new things, meet new people, push yourself out of your comfort zone. You will look back at your 4+ years at UConn and refer to them as "the good old days."

 

Who was your favorite professor and why?
My favorite professor is Jeannette Wick. She is extremely down to earth and personable, and she also happens to be the best medical writer I know. While I have taken many science-based courses during my time at UConn, sometimes it's the writing course or the elective course where you learn the most about yourself and about life. Professor Wick was able to do that for me.

Mallori Thompson

School of Law

Mallori Thompson
Why did you choose UConn?
Anyone that has ever seen the law school's campus knows exactly why I chose UConn! The first time I stepped foot on this beautiful campus, I knew that this was where I was supposed to be. Even though I grew up in Connecticut, I had been living in Atlanta for years and UConn Law brought me home.

 

What's your area of study and why did you choose it?
Upon graduation, I will have a J.D. with a Human Rights Certificate. I chose to focus on human rights because my perception of justice, and thus my career, is framed by the global struggle against racism, sexism, capitalism, and other oppressive structures.

 

What are your plans after graduation?
Days after graduation, I start a clerkship with the Chief Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court! Following my clerkship, I will be joining Robinson + Cole, LLP. I also plan to get involved in a wide variety of pro bono matters, working to increase access to justice.

 

What's something you learned in a class that you'll always remember?
We read hundreds of cases, but too often we forget that those pages carry the stories of real people dealing with issues that meant everything to them. One thing I will never forget is something I learned in the Asylum & Human Rights Clinic-what it feels like to have a real person depend on you to fight for them. Along with my client, Professors Jon Bauer and Valeria Gomez rehumanized law school for me.

 

What's one thing every student should do during their time at UConn?
Find your way to one of our fantastic mental health counselors! Everyone should make time for their mental and emotional health, and that is especially true for us as young professionals. There is no better time to start building healthy habits!

 

Who was your favorite professor and why?
I have so many favorite professors, but I have to name Professor Jamelia Morgan. I currently have three publications in legal journals-Professor Morgan advised one of the articles, but she inspired all of them. As a professor, as a scholar, as a human, she inspires me every day and I am more confident in my purpose after being her student. I do not know anyone more thoughtful and intentional about their work and their impact as Professor Morgan. I could go on for pages about Professor Morgan-this institution is lucky to have her.

Anthony Zor

School of Fine Arts

Anthony Zor
What's your major and why did you choose it?
I'm a Digital Media and Design major concentrating in digital film/video production. Going into college I knew I wanted to pursue my creativity skills, and this program was perfect in helping me achieve that. Plus, there are many concentrations within DMD that have made me a more well-rounded creator.

 

What activities were you involved with as a student?
I was mostly involved in the student-run television station, UCTV, where I was able to cover many big events on campus such as UConnic, HuskyTHON, etc. I was also part of the Student Activities Marketing Team, UConn Film Club, and a multimedia internship through the Office of Communications. All of these things have helped me gain so much experience in my field.

 

How has UConn prepared you for the next chapter in life?
I have learned and grown so much these past 4 years. I became so independent solving problems without any assistance. I feel more confident in myself and in my work. I have gotten so many opportunities that helped me become so experienced in what I do. Overall, I think UConn helped me find myself in ways I didn't even realize.

 

What's one thing every student should do during their time at UConn?
If I had to pick just one, I think every student should participate in Oozeball. I think that is a really fun event during Spring Weekend that UConn does a good job of putting together. It's a great way to make memories with your friends.

 

Who was your favorite professor and why?
I think my favorite professor would be Stephen Stifano in the Department of Communication. Being in three of his classes, I learned so much from him, and he has definitely changed me for the better. He gives the best advice and constructive criticism out of anyone I've ever met. Even when I wasn't in his class anymore and I needed help with something, he would still make time out of his busy schedule to assist me. I would also say Nicole Stier Justice in the Digital Media and Design Department. She has helped me a lot this year with my senior project as well as teaching me so much about the film industry.