Series

Tipping the Scales on Obesity

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that one in three children in the United States are obese or overweight, to the detriment of their health and well-being in both the short and the long-term.

UConn experts on obesity, nutrition, public policy, psychology, agriculture, and economics join with faculty from the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity to collaborate and conduct research that addresses the nationwide problem of obesity.

Two little girls eating lunch. (iStock Photo)

Federal Subsidies Promote Healthy Eating in Child Care Centers

Connecticut child care centers participating in a federal food assistance program do a better job at feeding preschoolers healthy foods than non-participating centers, according to a new study by the Rudd Center.

A group of preschoolers watch television. (Shutterstock Photo)

Preschoolers Still See TV Food Ads Despite Companies’ Promises

Because of a loophole in the companies’ pledges, children under 6 are still exposed to TV food ads, at an age when they are particularly vulnerable to advertising.

Fast food restaurants thrive in one of the poorest areas of Los Angeles. South LA has the highest concentration of fast-food restaurants of the city, about 400, and only a few grocery stores. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

Food Swamps Predict Obesity Rates Better Than Food Deserts

A new UConn Rudd Center study found that easy access to fast- and junk-food outlets was a better predictor of high obesity rates than lack of access to affordable, nutritious food.

A focus on positive coping strategies could help improve health for those who experience being teased or bullied because of their weight, according to new research by the UConn Rudd Center. (UConn Rudd Center Photo)

How People Cope with Weight Stigma Affects Their Health

A focus on positive coping strategies could help improve health for those who experience being teased or bullied because of their weight, according to new research by the UConn Rudd Center.

(Whitney Hubbard/UConn Photo)

Despite Progress, Most Food Advertising to Kids Still Unhealthy

'Ten years after the launch of food industry self-regulation, food advertising to children remains far from the goal of supporting healthful diets.'

A new study by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at UConn shows that many individuals who are targets of weight bias blame themselves for the stigma they experience. (Shutterstock Photo)

Many Americans Blame Themselves for Weight Stigma

A new study by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at UConn shows that many individuals who are targets of weight bias blame themselves for the stigma they experience.

A new UConn Rudd Center study shows that healthy lifestyle messages in food ads can make unhealthy products seem healthier to children.

‘Health Halo’ Effects of Food Ads Can Mislead Kids

A new UConn Rudd Center study shows that healthy lifestyle messages in food ads can make unhealthy products seem healthier to children.

Rudd Center researcher Jennifer Harris says reducing children’s consumption of nutritionally poor fast food will require much more than just not listing unhealthy items on the menu. (Bret Eckhardt/UConn Photo)

Fast-Food Restaurants Not Promoting Healthy Kids’ Meal Options

Breaking News: Yesterday, McDonald's announced it is making Happy Meals healthier, a move advocated by UConn's Rudd Center.

Although the overall number of food-related ads kids see is down, the majority of the ads still promote unhealthy foods and beverages.

Food Advertising to Kids Still Promotes Unhealthy Foods

Although the overall number of food-related ads kids see is down, the majority of the ads still promote unhealthy foods and beverages.

A new study shows that actions to demand improvements would be most welcomed in communities of color, where children are also exposed to greater amounts of unhealthy food marketing. (Shutterstock Photo)

Parents Concerned About Unhealthy Food Marketing to Children

A new study shows that actions to demand improvements would be most welcomed in communities of color, where children are also exposed to greater amounts of unhealthy food marketing.

An increase in the number of ads aired per hour of TV viewing impacted black youth more than white, according to a new UConn Rudd Center study. (UConn Rudd Center Photo)

Black Kids Exposed to Even More Junk Food Ads than White Kids

An increase in the number of ads aired per hour of TV viewing impacted black youth more than white, according to a new UConn Rudd Center study.

(Whitney Hubbard, UConn Rudd Center/UConn Photo)

Baby Food Ads Often Contradict Health Experts

Marketing messages may lead parents to think food and drink for very young children is healthier than it really is, says a new study from the UConn Rudd Center.

Four institutions create research alliance for inquiry into metabolic diseases.

State’s Leading Institutions Launch International Effort to Advance Metabolic Research

UConn, Yale University, and the Jackson Laboratory linked with Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel to collaborate on projects that swiftly move investigations into clinical application and commercialization.

Revisions to the WIC program in 2009 that included new subsidies for fruit, vegetables, and whole grains and restrictions on milk fat content have led to improved nutrition for low-income pregnant women, new mothers, and their young children without any additional cost, according to a new study by the UConn Rudd Center. (USDA Photo)

Changes in WIC Food Assistance Program Pay Off in Healthier Purchases

WIC participants are buying healthier foods overall as a result of changes introduced in 2009, says UConn Rudd Center researcher.

An African American father makes a peanut butter sandwich for his 5 year-old son's lunch. (iStock Photo)

Adding Dad to Kids’ Diet Decisions

A new UConn study is taking a look at combating child obesity with a father-focused approach.

A new study shows that support is growing for state and federal laws to protect children from weight-based bullying. (iStock Photo)

Support Increasing for Laws Against Weight-Based Bullying

A UConn researcher says a growing number of parents favor anti-bullying laws to protect children from bullying based on weight.

Children eating breakfast at school. (Shutterstock Photo)

School Breakfasts Support Healthy Weight, Study Shows

Researchers say middle schoolers who eat breakfast at school are less likely to be overweight or obese than those who skip breakfast.

Bullying can take many forms and the effects are often long-lasting. (iStock Photo)

Adding Heft to Anti-Bullying Campaigns

The latest in a series about the cutting-edge research on obesity happening at UConn.

A spoon with cash, representing a cash reward for weight loss. (iStock Photo)

Small Cash Rewards Pay Off in Weight Loss Plans

In contrast to large cash rewards, smaller sums for weight loss also motivated people to keep it off, a new study found. Part of a semester-long series exploring obesity research by UConn faculty.

An African American congregation at worship. (iStock/UConn Photo)

Blending Faith and Science to Combat Obesity

Part of a semester-long series exploring obesity research by UConn faculty.

Pebbles Rock the Vault, a Post Co. video game for children.

‘Advergames’ a New Front in Fight Against Childhood Obesity

Part of a semester-long series exploring obesity research by UConn faculty.

Farmers markets provide an abundance of locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Dollars to Pounds: Boosting Purchasing Power to Lower Obesity Rates

The first in a semester-long series exploring obesity research by UConn faculty.