Astonishing Army Ants

Katie Taylor, a Ph.D. student in ecology and evolutionary biology, tells visitors about samples under a microscope at the Biology/Physics Building during UConn Extension Bug Week AntU Day on July 27, 2017. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
AntU Day on July 27, one of the main events of this year's Bug Week, was an invitation to explore and engage in activities focused on the complex biological systems of army ants and their hundreds of associated species, or 'guests.' (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

SHARELINES

 

AntU Day on July 27, one of the main events of this year’s Bug Week, was an invitation to explore and engage in activities focused on the complex biological systems of army ants and their hundreds of associated species, or ‘guests.’

AntU is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation to the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and is intended to preserve and curate the University’s collection of 2 million army and guests that resulted from 50 years of fieldwork in Central and South America by the late Professor Carl Rettenmeyer and his wife Marian. The exhibition of specimens from the collection, located in the Biology/Physics Building, opened to the public for the first time in April.