Shawn Kornegay


Author Archive

Two little happy girls playing on a tablet PC computing device in library at school.

UConn Researchers to Reimagine Dual Language Education

The University of Connecticut has been awarded a $179,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Postsecondary Education for a new research project centered on reimagining dual language education. The project’s purpose is to improve the ability of dual language programs to promote the equitable bilingualism and biliteracy development of all students through a greater focus on sociocultural competence.

Miguel Cardona, a UConn alum, who has been selected as President-Elect Biden's nominee for Secretary of Education.

UConn’s Neag School Alum Miguel Cardona Tapped to Be Biden’s Education Secretary

Miguel Cardona ’01 MA, ’04 6th Year, ’11 Ed.D., ’12 ELP has been selected by President-elect Joe Biden to be the next US Secretary of Education.

Amid COVID, Schools Can Help Families of Children With Disabilities

Editor’s Note: Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor Sandra Chafouleas, who serves as director of the UConn Collaboratory on School and Child Health (CSCH) co-published with CSCH postdoctoral research associate Emily Iovino ’15 (ED), ’16 MA, ’20 the following piece on supporting caregivers of children with disabilities in The Conversation.   Children don’t come with how-to manuals. Even […]

Candlelight with shadow background.

Neag School Mourns Loss of Faculty Emeritus, Donor Vincent Rogers

Vincent Rogers of Storrs, Connecticut, a longtime educator and faculty emeritus at the Neag School of Education, died Thursday, Dec. 3, at age 93. He died at home, surrounded by his loving family. “We share our deepest condolences with the Rogers family, whose generosity over the years toward the Neag School has made a tangible […]

Woman sets table for holidays.

Finding Joy Through the Holiday Season

The pandemic is bringing an atypical holiday season this year, presenting change in the things we do, the way we do them, and who we do them with. We may miss out on getting together in person with family and friends, traveling to cherished places, or taking part in our traditional celebrations. Forced upon us, these unfamiliar changes can evoke feelings of loss and frustration.

College students gather in front of Buckingham Palace in London.

Expanding Global Ed, Intercultural Learning at the Neag School

Associate Professor David Moss has spent the past six years actively expanding Neag School study abroad programs around the world as the Neag School’s global education director, and the past 20 years coordinating UConn’s long-standing London study abroad program in education.

Joseph Renzulli gives welcoming remarks at Confratute.

The Renzulli Center: A Worldwide Leader in Gifted Education

Joseph Renzulli served as founding director of the Neag Center, the Lynn and Ray Neag Endowed Chair for Talent Development, as well as the first director of the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT), then one of a dozen centers in the U.S. focused on addressing significant issues in the education of gifted and talented students, and enrichment education. Under Renzulli’s guidance, the Neag Center evolved into one of the leading centers in gifted education and talent development in the world.

Female hands type onto laptop; learning during a pandemic.

Reading and Language Arts Center Champions Literacy Amid Pandemic

The Neag School of Education's Reading and Language Arts Center is helping schools around the state in the pandemic-caused shift to online learning.

Young student watching lesson online and studying from home. Young woman taking notes while looking at computer screen following professor doing math on video call. Latin girl student studying from home and watching teacher explaining math formula on video chat.

What We Know About Online Learning

The situation with COVID-19 has challenged many school systems to consider how to extend their teaching and learning into virtual settings from home. Sometimes called “distance learning” because the teacher and the students are not in the same room, this form of virtual teaching and learning has a rich history and several forms. The use of technology, particularly the internet, to support remote learning is nothing new.

Karen Skudlarek, left, and Lauren Schlesselman conduct an online meeting.

Alumni, Students Assist in UConn’s Transition to Remote Learning

The University had originally planned to conduct remote learning for two weeks following spring break, but growing health concerns led to a fully online transition for the Spring 2020 semester. UConn faculty members, some of whom had never administered remote courses before, had to transition their coursework quickly to align with the new remote teaching style. Neag School alumna Karen Skudlarek ’88 (BUS), ’16 MA and her colleagues at CETL have been instrumental in the process.