UConn to Go Red for Women’s Health During Heart Health Month

Wear a piece of red clothing on Friday, Feb. 3, National Wear Red Day, to help raise awareness of the importance of preventing heart disease and stroke in women. (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health Photo)
Wear a piece of red clothing on Friday, Feb. 3, National Wear Red Day, to help raise awareness of the importance of preventing heart disease and stroke in women. (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health Photo)

SHARELINES

UConn Health’s Pat and Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center and the American Heart Association are calling on members of UConn Nation to wear a piece of red clothing on Friday, Feb. 3, National Wear Red Day, to help raise greater awareness about the importance of preventing heart disease and stroke in women.

Don’t forget to share on social media how you chose to Go Red for Women with UConn and UConn Health, with a photo using the hashtag #GoRedCT.

In addition, donations are welcome to UConn’s Team to further support the American Heart Association’s mission of increasing awareness and scientific research to improve cardiovascular health among women.

More about Women’s Heart Health

Cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease, heart attack, and stroke, are the number one killer of American women: these diseases take a woman’s life every 80 seconds in the U.S.

Yet the majority of cardiovascular diseases that develop are preventable, with the practice of a healthy lifestyle.

“Women, young and old, must stay vigilant and take action each and every day to prevent development of cardiovascular disease or having a heart attack or stroke event in their lifetime and to maintain their overall health,” says Dr. Joyce Meng, cardiologist at the Calhoun Cardiology Center of UConn Health.

Experts at the Calhoun Cardiology Center share the following cardiovascular health awareness information with women:

Three steps to prevent heart disease:

  • Eat a heart-healthy diet, high in colorful fruits and vegetables and low in sugar, salt, saturated fat, and fried foods.
  • Exercise daily, at least 30 minutes a day at moderate intensity.
  • Avoid tobacco smoke, which leads to narrow and hardened arteries and a higher risk of heart attack and stroke.

Six modifiable risk factors of cardiovascular diseases to control:

  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • High blood pressure
  • Lack of exercise
  • Cigarette smoking

Female heart attack warning signs:

  • Unusual chest pain, pressure, or discomfort
  • Shortness of breath
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Heartburn
  • Jaw, neck, arm, or shoulder pain
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness and nausea

Warning signs of a stroke:

  • Numbness or weakness of face, arm, and/or leg
  • Facial droop
  • Acute vision changes
  • Difficulty in speaking
  • Trouble understanding simple statements
  • Confusion
  • Trouble walking or maintaining balance

“Most importantly, if you think you are having symptoms related to a heart attack or stroke, don’t hesitate to call 9-1-1 right away. You may regret it if you don’t call quickly,” says Dr. Agnes Kim, a UConn Health cardiologist. “Fast action could save your life, be further protective to your heart muscle, brain, or body, and also enhance your chances for a full or better recovery.”

For more information about the Calhoun Cardiology Center at UConn Health visit: health.uconn.edu/cardiology. Also, during February’s Heart Month, visit UConn Today for our new Heart Health story series, starting Feb. 1.

Help make a difference for patients with heart disease at UConn by making a gift to the Pat and Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center at UConn Health.