As the Year Draws to a Close, Take Another Look

(Michelle Kondrich/Illustration for UConn)
A celebration of the work of artists and writers, who collaborate to enhance the visibility of UConn as a top-tier research institution. (Michelle Kondrich/Illustration for UConn)

Throughout the year, UConn Today, UConn Magazine, and UConn Health Journal increase visibility for the work at UConn as a top-tier research institution. The storytelling is done by a talented team of editors, writers, photographers, designers, and videographers. Here, we celebrate the work of artists and writers, who often collaborate to draw readers into the stories. Take another look at the work of these teams in 2018.

Lucy Engelman/Ilustrations for UConn
(Lucy Engelman Illustration for UConn)

The I.Q. of A.I.

UConn researchers are teaching robots to think like humans. Is that a good idea? (Colin Poitras for UConn Magazine)


(Yesenia Carrero/UConn Illustration)
(Yesenia Carrero/UConn Illustration)

Invasion of the Body-Snatching Fungus

UConn researchers recently documented in Nature Scientific Reports a gory and fascinating relationship between periodical cicadas and a fungus that infects them, hijacks their behavior, and causes a scene straight out of a zombie movie. (Elaina Hancock for UConn Today)


If you can understand pizza and poker, you can understand Bitcoin – and David Noble believes you should. (Illustration by Andrew Colin Beck for UConn)
(Andrew Colin Beck Illustration for UConn)

Bitcoin Believers

If you can understand pizza and poker, you can understand Bitcoin – and David Noble believes you should. (Peter Nelson for UConn Magazine)


(Rob Dobi/Illustration for UConn)
(Rob Dobi Illustration for UConn)

The Everything Algorithm

How to win your NFL pool, thwart a terrorist, maximize your delivery routes, and find the perfect kidney match. (Jeff Wagenheim for UConn Magazine)


A special team of medical literature experts are on the hunt for cancer's kryptonite, one mutation at a time. (Kailey Whitman Illustration for UConn)
(Kailey Whitman Illustration for UConn)

Curators Versus Cancer

A special team of medical literature experts are on the hunt for cancer’s kryptonite, one mutation at a time. (Kim Krieger for the UConn Health Journal)


Juricán, from the Taino legend to explain hurricanes in the West Indies. (John Bailey/UConn Illustration)
Juricán, from the Taino legend to explain hurricanes in the West Indies. (John Bailey/UConn Illustration)

The Impact of Hurricanes on the Ecosystem in Puerto Rico

UConn professor of ecology and evolutionary biology Michael Willig is part of an international team that has spent the past 30 years studying elements of the ecosystem in hurricane-prone Puerto Rico, and how that ecosystem responds to weather-driven disturbances. (Elaina Hancock for UConn Today)


Climate Change in Our Backyard
Climate Change in Our Backyard (Yesenia Carrero/UConn Illustration)

Climate Change in Our Backyard

When you think of climate change, what comes to mind? Rather than drawing upon images of far-flung regions, just look out your window and you will likely see something resulting from our changing climate. This series aims to draw your attention to some of the rapid transitions happening locally, and explore the many ways UConn students and researchers are investigating and responding to environmental trends around us. (Series by Elaina Hancock for UConn Today)


Cancer cells tend to hoard iron, and researchers at UConn Health have found that iron may be playing a critical role in fueling the cells' growth through increased fatty acid synthesis. (Yesenia Carrero/UConn Illustration)
(Yesenia Carrero/UConn Illustration)

Ovarian Cancer Cells Hoard Iron to Fuel Growth

Cancer cells tend to hoard iron, and researchers at UConn Health have found that iron may be playing a critical role in fueling the cells’ growth through increased fatty acid synthesis. (Kim Krieger for UConn Today)


Think tick, or risk being tricked by these 'blood-sucking vampires,' cautions pathobiologist Paulo Verardi, whose lab is working to develop vaccines for a number of emerging tick-borne diseases. (Yesenia Carrero/UConn Illustration)
(Yesenia Carrero/UConn Illustration)

Tick-or-Treat!

Think tick, or risk being tricked by these ‘blood-sucking vampires,’ cautions pathobiologist Paulo Verardi, whose lab is working to develop vaccines for a number of emerging tick-borne diseases. (Elaina Hancock for UConn Today)


(Michelle Kondrich Illustration for UConn)

By a Thread

Cambodian refugees, severely tortured 40 years ago, are suffering from trauma-related diseases today. A team of UConn professors is helping them here, and in their homeland. (Julie (Stagis) Bartucca ’10 (BUS, CLAS) for UConn Magazine)

 


(Yesenia Carrero/UConn Illustration)

Blueprint for the Skull

A new UConn Health study has found that cleft palate is caused by a disruption of the regulatory pieces of DNA. (Kim Krieger for UConn Today)