Elaina Hancock


Author Archive

Mango being picked from tree. (Getty Images)

Lab Identifies Way to Reduce Salmonella Outbreaks in Mangoes

A UConn lab recently processed 4,000 mangoes and water samples to test the efficacy of three disinfectants commonly used by the industry to reduce contamination. What they found surprised them.

Thomas Worthley, associate extension professor, points out damage caused by emerald ash borers on a tree along Horsebarn Hill Road on Aug. 29, 2017. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

Big Changes in Store for UConn’s Trees and Yours

The invasive Emerald Ash Borer, which has already killed millions of ash trees, has arrived in Storrs.

A total solar eclipse is only visible from Earth when the moon is new and at a node, meaning the sun and Earth are aligned with the moon in the middle. (Yesenia Carrero/UConn Image)

A Total Eclipse of the Heart (of America)

On Aug. 21, a solar eclipse will be visible throughout North America for the first time in 38 years. UConn astronomer Cynthia Peterson explains what to expect.

Skylar Dodge, 11, of Woodstock, adjusts the buoyancy of her underwater remotely operated vehicle at the Wolff-Zackin Natatorium during the SPARK camp for girls on July 19, 2017. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

New Program Immerses Teens in STEM Challenges

A new summer camp to encourage girls to pursue STEM disciplines gave teens the opportunity to build and operate underwater robots.

Aesop's Fable, The Ants and the Grasshopper. (Library of Congress)

In Making Decisions, Are You an Ant or a Grasshopper?

Although it may seem less appealing, the ant's strategy of delaying gratification in the children's fable by Aesop should not be viewed in a negative light.

Ticks cannot fly or jump but they are particularly good at hitchhiking, using a behavior called 'questing.' (John Bailey/UConn Illustration)

Tick-hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

To avoid ticks, you must think like a tick.

Close-up of a gypsy moth on an apple tree. (Getty Images)

Invasion of the Gypsy Moths

Despite the havoc caused by thousands of gypsy moths in New England this year, UConn experts offer two signs of hope: many of the affected trees will grow new leaves, and a fungus has recently begun to kill the moths.